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Heaters And Asthma: What's The Best Option?

 

inhaler

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 12 people in the United States has asthma, an often lifelong condition that causes chronic coughing, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and shortness of breath. If you suffer from asthma, you know how life-altering this disease can be and how important it is to take every precaution to avoid triggering an asthma attack. How does your heater or heating system factor into this? Here are a few things every asthma patient should know.

Asthma In Winter

Winter can be a particularly difficult time for asthma sufferers for two reasons: cold weather outside and spending more time indoors. The airways of someone with asthma are very sensitive and cold temperatures can easily affect them. On the other hand, staying indoors may subject those with asthma to pet dander, mold, and dust mites. Indoor wood fires and unflued gas heaters can also trigger asthma symptoms from particulates getting into the air.

What Is The Best Heating Option?

Electric Heaters

 

electric heater

Because they do not circulate air, emit particulates, or produce excess moisture, electric heaters are considered to be the safest option for asthma sufferers. Not to mention, they are a versatile and affordable option. When selecting your heating unit, be sure to avoid forced-air electric heaters because those models will circulate the air in your home. You should also note that electric heaters only heat people and objects within a certain range, not the air around them. Therefor, the air in the room may still be a little chilly. Doctors recommend covering your mouth and nose with a winter mask or scarf to help if the cold air is irritating.

Oil Heaters

Also known as column heaters, oil heaters actually fall into the category of electric heaters and work much the same way. A heating element at the bottom of the unit operates on electricity. This element heats the oil inside the compartments of the unit which, in turn, heats the area around it. Oil heaters are very safe to use in small spaces. Most models have a tilt switch that will immediately turn the unit off if it falls over. 

Also known as column heaters, oil heaters actually fall into the category of electric heaters and work much the same way. A heating element at the bottom of the unit operates on electricity. This element heats the oil inside the compartments of the unit which, in turn, heats the area around it. Oil heaters are very safe to use in small spaces. Most models have a tilt switch that will immediately turn the unit off if it falls over. 

Gas Heaters

If your home relies on gas heating in the winter, you can definitely still use this system if it has a flue. If not, you will want to have one installed. A flue will channel the gas outside where it will not affect your asthma. Don't worry. Clean gasses like propane will not hurt the environment so there is no issue in releasing them outside your home.

radiant

Hydronic

While a hydronic heating system for your home is certainly more costly and complicated than using electric heaters, it may be necessary for those with severe asthma. These radiant floor heating systems allow hot water to flow through tubing that is installed into your home's concrete foundation, thus heating the entire floor.

 

From all of us at Heater.com to all of you, we wish you a happy and healthy winter season!